Mollaret's Meningitis Association For a world free of Mollaret's Meningitis

Diagnosis

Mollaret’s Meningitis can be diagnosed through lumbar puncture (spinal tap) in order to examine the cerebrospinal fluid (the clear, colorless liquid that fills and surrounds the brain and the spinal cord and provides a mechanical barrier against shock). Diagnosis is made by detecting Herpes simplex virus DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid. Early diagnosis may prevent prolonged hospital admissions, unnecessary investigations, and exposure to unnecessary medications, along with their associated costs. If a patient has had a recent head injury or a problem with their immune system, they may not qualify for a lumbar puncture because of a possible fatal brain herniation; therefore, a CT or MRI scan may be performed prior to any lumbar puncture. All of the different types of meningitis (viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic) are diagnosed by the growing presence of bacteria in the spinal fluid, a sample of which is collected with the help of a lumbar puncture. The fluid will reveal if the CSF (cerebral spinal fluid) has raised or lowered white blood cell production.


There are no vaccines currently available to prevent the development of viral meningitis. Many people who have a rare disease understandably want to find healthcare professionals or researchers with knowledge of their condition. However, with a condition as rare as Mollaret’s Meningitis, it can be extremely difficult to find medical professionals who have treated more than one or two cases.